Not your average animal rescue...

(A 501(c)(3) Non-Profit, No-Kill Rescue)

Established in 2002, East County Animal Rescue is a grassroots effort of volunteers who are passionate about helping animals in need within the San Diego community. Many of our volunteers have dedicated their lives to helping animals. As the only rescue in the area executing TNR, we are most often found out on the streets of the community going to great lengths to spay and neuter animals. Often, we are the organization that steps in when others can't or won't.

 
Amber, Yvette, and Josh - Trapping project 2013.

Amber, Yvette, and Josh - Trapping project 2013.

Saving lives by spaying and neutering

We are committed to the animals that have been left behind. Our activities are rooted in reducing the overpopulation issues in our community. We do this through extensive spay/neuter activities.

Last year alone we spayed & neutered over 1,000 animals

 

IMG_2019.JPG

Trap-Neuter-Return

Our focus is on saving lives through spaying and neutering. Trap Neuter Return, or TNR, is our primary activity.

Learn More →

 
Coco Julia Silva Symmonds Redidy.jpg

Spaying & Neutering Pets

We assist the public with spaying and neutering their pets. Last year we spayed & neutered over 1,000 animals.

 
flounder2.jpg

Giving second chances

These poor brother kitties were living in a feral colony in San Diego's East County when trapped by an ECAR volunteer for TNR. ECAR provided eye surgery for both boys and tamed (socialized) them. They are now up for adoption!

 

175108_134130149985936_5796053_o.jpg

Finding Homes

We have found safe and loving homes for thousands of animals in the San Diego community.

Learn More →

 
200022_143344872397797_144095_n.jpg

Providing medical Care

We provide life saving care to feral cats and other animals who may otherwise never receive help.

 
539269_447128825352732_1495226438_n.jpg

a place to call home

We are very limited on resources to provide permanent homes. However, in our activities we come across cats who can't go back to where they came from and are not adoptable – like Old Man Gray, pictured here, whose owner died and he was left in a feral colony. After being pulled out of a wheel well we discovered he had stomatitis and had to have his teeth removed. He lived with us until he died of old age in 2014.